Collaborations

As part of our commitment to advancing human health, we participate in strategic collaborations with academic and commercial partners that are complementary to our expertise in chelation chemistry and synthesis.

These partnerships are always win/win undertakings with the goal of providing better service to our clients, producing new intellectual property, and publication of important scientific data in high impact journals.

Some of our valued collaborators are:

  • MDS Nordion – New ligands for radiopharmaceutical applications – MDS Nordion and Macrocyclics Inc. have entered into a research and development collaboration to develop innovative, bifunctional chelates for use in molecular imaging and targeted therapeutic pharmaceuticals in 2005. The collaboration is ongoing and has resulted in the discovery of several new ligands systems that are expected to accelerate the development of Cu-64 and Ga-68 PET imaging applications.

  • VU University – Development of new bifunctional ligands for PET imaging with Zr-89 – Macrocyclics and researchers at VU have been working on new bifunctional ligands designed specifically for the long-lived PET isotope Zr-89.

  • Washington University – Nanoparticle Based Imaging Platforms – Researchers at Washington University have developed a perfluorocarbon emulsified nanoparticle technology that can act as a platform for assembling antibodies imaging agents on surface of the particle vis lipophilic binding.  As part of a collaborative study Macrocyclics designed  novel phospholipid based MR contrast agents that bond to the nanoparticle through strong lipophilic interactions.  The combination of antifibrin targeted antibodies and lipophilic contrast agent produced targeted nanoparticles that demonstrate significant T1-weighted image enhancement on the surface of blood clots.

    collaboration

  • Yale UniversityDevelopment of multifunctional MRI contrast agents for molecular imaging – Researchers at Yale and Macrocyclics are working together on research proposal aimed at developing a new family of MRI contrast agents that monitor multiple physiological events simultaneously.

     

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